Faculty Profile


Megan Huisingh-Scheetz
Section of Geriatrics
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Megan.Huisingh-Scheetz@uchospitals.edu
Referring Physician Access Line: 1-877-DOM-2730

Academic Interests

Dr. Huisingh-Scheetz uses her background in Geriatrics and Epidemiology to study the role of activity in the pathophysiology of frailty and aging. As a clinician investigator and NIA K23 recipient, her research has focused on understanding how objectively measured activity and sedentary behavior patterns, resting metabolic rate, and body composition relate to frailty progression and frailty-related outcomes. Through her work, she analyzes accelerometry data to assess and trend activity patterns as markers of frailty and to inform frailty activity interventions using the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project dataset, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey dataset, and local data. In partnership with NORC and Orbita, Inc, Dr. Huisingh-Scheetz also developed and is studying the impact of EngAGE, a technology-based tool utilizing a voice assistant to deliver exercise programming to older adults in their home to reduce frailty. The program leverages caregivers to provide social motivation to the older adult to simultaneously combat loneliness.
 

Clinical Interests

Dr. Huisingh-Scheetz helped establish and now co-directs a novel frailty evaluation clinic, the Successful Aging and Frailty Evaluation™ (SAFE) clinic, in which she assesses and manages frail older adults in consultation. The SAFE clinic is located at the South Shore Senior Center and offers consultation to primary care physicians, sub-specialty physicians, and self-referred patients. She also sees patients in consultation at the hospital
 

Publications

  • Huisingh-Scheetz M, Walston J. How should older adults with cancer be evaluated for frailty? Journal of Geriatric Oncology. 2017; 8(1):8-15. PMC ID: 5161734.
  • Kocherginsky M, Huisingh-Scheetz M (co-first author), Dale W, Lauderdale D, Waite. Monitoring Daytime Activity Among U.S. Older Adults: How many days of accelerometry are enough? PloS One. 2017; 12(1): e0170082. PMC ID: 5231361.
  • Huisingh-Scheetz M, Wroblewski K, Kocherginsky M, Huang E, Dale W, Waite L, Schumm P. Physical Activity and Frailty Among Older Adults In the U.S. Based on Hourly Accelerometry Data. J of Gerontology Med Sci. Journals of Gerontology: Series A Medical Sciences (Editor’s Choice Article). 2018; 73(5):622-629. PMC ID: 5905616
  • Ho EC, Hawkley L, Waite L, Dale W, Huisingh-Scheetz M. Social capital predicts accelerometry-measured physical activity among older adults in the U.S.: A cross-sectional study in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. BMC Public Health. 2018; 18(1):804. PMC ID: 6020417.
  • Huisingh-Scheetz M, Martinchek M, Becker Y, Ferguson MK, Thompson K. Translating Frailty Research Into Clinical Practice: Insights From the Successful Aging and Frailty Evaluation Clinic. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2019 Jun;20(6):672-678. PMC ID: 6538427.
For a complete list of publications click here:

Training

  • BS, 2001, Butler University, Biology
  • MD, 2006, University of Illinois College of Medicine,
  • MPH, 2007, University of Illinois Chicago, Epidemiology
  • Residency, 2010, University of Chicago, Internal Medicine
  • Fellowship, 2012, University of Chicago, Geriatrics